Letter to the UW Law School- 2016

“The ultimate tragedy is not the oppression and cruelty by the bad people but the
silence over that by the good people.” – Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Dear University of Washington School of Law:

In solidarity with the greater UW student community, we submit our call to justice,
inviting UW Law to #WalkTheWalk and transform our institution. The following letter
provides our assessment of the current state of the law school’s affairs and an updated
list of demands to liberate our education from racist oppression.

  1.  “Leaders for the Global Common Good.” This is the motto that attracted
    so many of us to this institution. However, the school’s limited response to the
    ongoing civil and racial injustices perpetuated by the state demonstrates that we
    are out of touch, and falling short of this noble and ambitious accolade. With
    respect and hope we, as law students, write to you again to right the ship; to
    demand urgent action and chart the course we set out last year for a more
    inclusive, diverse and aware learning environment. In addition, the attempt to
    change this motto comes across as arrogant and dismissive of public interest
    concerns and the call to social justice and responsibility.
  2. Our nation is at a pivotal moment in understanding and addressing
    oppression and structural racism. Social justice advocates must refocus
    their efforts to affirmatively advance racial equity. Yet UW Law has taken a
    cursory, shallow glance at what the rest of the nation is viewing in-depth. The
    most prestigious, highly ranked law school in the Pacific Northwest—a law school
    in a city with a significant history of police use of force and racist practices—has
    remained mostly silent on the pertinent legal events earning national and
    international attention today. What does that persistent silence tell us about our
    agency, our values, and our role as law students in this movement?
  3. There is a cultural disconnect that is pervasive throughout this institution. After students pushed for a response by the administration to the non-indictments of Darren Wilson and NYPD officers in late 2014, a brief email was sent to UW Law students, inviting us to a lecture by Jeff Robinson. The event was well attended, and Mr. Robinson’s words were inspirational; however, a year later, UW Law has yet to follow up with any institutional action other than those actions and programs manifested by students themselves. This lack of responsiveness is pervasive throughout the institution, and contributes to the hostile environment within the law school that leaves students with marginalized identities behind. Yet all of this is no surprise with our minimally diverse student body, including only 2.5% African Americans.

UW Law has a history of student-led progress for racial equality. In 2013,
student opposition extinguished plans for a proposed prosecution clinic at the school. In
2014, Critical Race Theory was finally added to the curriculum in response to student
action. Current 2Ls demanded and received a 1L Critical Race option for their spring
term and additionally added an important anti-racism component to the Foundations
for Legal Study (FLS) program. Although movements like these are important and
admirable, they rely disproportionately on those students who particularly
overburdened by both schoolwork and the hostile environment of this institution.
Leaving all of the anti-racist and social justice work to law students is a distressing
signal from this school. The institution is in need of a cultural shift.
We believe UW Law can develop the next generation of leaders to exercise our
independent collective power to work towards a world without symptoms of
institutional racism. If we want a more racially equitable education system, we must
engage in difficult dialogue and continually question assumptions, experiences and
methodology. It’s time we lead by example. It’s time we earn the right to call ourselves
“Leaders for the Global Common Good.”

DEMANDS

As University of Washington School of Law students of color and allies, we declare a
state of emergency and demand the following from our institution:
● We demand a radical increase in the representation of diverse communities at the
law school. As a public institution our demographics should be representative of the
community. For both the inclusiveness of traditionally marginalized populations and
the enhancement of our learning environment– diversity of background equals
diversity of ideas—which translates into more stimulating classroom discussion and
debate.
● The law school should strive for a diverse student population more in line with the
community. For example, 8% African American student population to match the city
of Seattle or, ideally, 14% to match the United States. Given the historical underrepresentation
of African Americans in the legal profession, we are appalled that
only 2 UW Law degrees were awarded to African Americans in 2014. Similarly, UW
Law has 5% Hispanic enrollment, compared to 14% of the Washington State
population.
● Continue exploring a new “Alternative Admissions Program” coupled with
academic support for applicants from non-traditional backgrounds. Although
poaching the limited national pool for “qualified” applicants of color is the
traditional method of increasing diversity, we believe it’s our duty to promote true
equality through the redistribution of intellectual capital. We believe this goal is
more important than any potential impact on the law school’s ranking.
● Continue institutional support and funding for the Law Scholars Program which is
dedicated to providing mentoring and academic/LSAT support to foster the interest
and success of future law school applicants in the community.
● Recruit and retain more diverse faculty members, including Latino/Hispanic and
African American tenured professors. Include as part of the tenure review process
cultural sensitivity, research, and demonstrated actions that promote diversity and
awareness.
● Create a full-time, paid staff position to facilitate issues of diversity. Dozens of
students have organized through several student groups to begin working towards
these goals; such a position would serve as a point-of-contact and be invaluable
towards cultivating further ideas and actions. This position should have actual
decision-making power. It is unclear what the impact is of multiple positions with
partial diversity components; we worry about sustainability and unity of diversity
undertakings using this model of leadership.
● Include students on the Admissions panel, particularly students with marginalized
identities. Students can speak better to what types of voices and opinions need to be
reflected in the law school.
● Ensure transparency for the generous gift of $56.1M from Jack MacDonald. The
scholarship income from this trust should be prioritized with the mission of
recruiting, enrolling, and retaining a more diverse student body.
● We demand a curriculum more clearly focused on the mission of
creating leaders for the global common good. Such courses will provide a
foundation of social justice for graduates in careers of all types, and will work
synergistically with the demands above.

  1. Offer more social justice courses for 2Ls and 3Ls. A survey should assess student
    demand for specific courses, but we believe UCLA Law’s course offerings can
    provide a starting point.
  2. Support professors and students involved in the new 1L Critical Legal Studies
    class which includes big-picture elements of history, philosophy, critical legal
    studies, implicit bias, and critical race/feminist theory. Breaking the cycle of
    indoctrination and redirecting student focus to the global common good will
    require concerted effort from UW Law administration and faculty. The
    instructors who volunteered to take on discussion sections should have
    demonstrable backing from this school to help them excel in teaching this new
    curriculum.
  3. Make Critical Race Theory available annually for 1Ls in the spring. Students
    should not have to continually organize in order to get a one-credit elective each
    year.
  4. Continue mandatory baseline training relating to issues of race and implicit
    bias and follow-up the training with supplemental activities and events
    throughout the year. As lawyers, we will all be interacting with people. Just as the
    UW Medical School recognizes this important aspect of future professional life,
    we ask that UW Law encourage cultural competency training. This training
    should start at FLS, continue through the 1L curriculum, and include an elective
    requirement for cultural competency classes in the 2L and/or 3L years.
  5. Create a training program for faculty to discuss issues of race and diversity.
    Include a student presence in said training.
  6. Course assessments should include some evaluation criteria for a professor’s
    ability to create an inclusive learning environment.
  7. Create an alternative spring break service project to allow students the
    opportunity to engage with communities, learn about real-world injustices,
    expand their world-view and learn about possible solutions and actions. Give
    students an opportunity to learn beyond the walls of the law school, beyond the
    few pages discussing these issues in our texts, beyond the comforts of Seattle.
    Today we charge all members of UW Law to express solidarity with and support all law students. We believe that our community has the courage of its convictions. We are therefore committed to working with our peers, teachers, and administration to become true leaders for the global common good.

This letter was created by students of color and allies at the University of Washington School of Law-May 2016

Advertisements

Organize Law School for Racial Justice

UW Law alum and current students recently met on campus to celebrate the release of a new zine entitled “How to Stop a Prosecution Clinic: Organize Your Law School for Racial Justice.”

(If that link does not work for you, try typing in the actual address: http://www.arkansasjusticecollective.org/organizelawschool )

The zine is the product of months of work and coordination between students and alum, and it is the first in a new phase of intentionally cross-generational efforts by students and alum.  The back cover of the zine sums its purpose up nicely, and it reads:

  • When the voices and needs of marginalized people are centered, decisions can be made that improve access to life chances for everyone. This is trickle-up justice.
  • When a prosecutor approaches a law school–a law school overflowing with microaggressions–about a prosecution clinic and the law school claims it would help advance racial justice, this is trickle-down justice. (It works just as poorly as trickle-down economics.)
  • If the law school had centered the voices of people of color and other marginalized folks from the beginning, it would have noticed we weren’t asking to be put in cages.
  • This attitude of “we know what’s best” for people of color and for poor people is called trickle-down justice, and it was not surprising from a law school that for years ignored student calls for racial justice across the board.
  • This zine tells the story of how we halted an expansion of the racist and gendered violence of mass incarceration and how we used the moment to get the school to hire its only tenure-track Latina professor, offer a Critical Race Theory course, and finally secure a long-promised equitability plan.
  • If your law school has work to do on racial justice, then this zine might just be useful for you.

http://www.arkansaslaw.org/organizelawschool
(downloadable PDF and an audio version of the zine)

STATEMENT REGARDING THE MICROAGGRESSIONS POSTERS

We want to thank everyone that participated in and supported yesterday’s walk out, demands, and shared their stories. Seeing the number of UW law students, faculty and staff that showed up was incredibly powerful and moving.

The walk-out and microaggressions were not intended as a one-time action. They are a starting point and meant to initiate a candid dialogue – which we are so thrilled to see has happened. We hope this momentum continues in our meetings, classrooms, and other spaces, and are excited for our movement to grow continuously from here. The microaggressions posters were organized by the Law Students Working Against Institutional Racism (LSWAIR), and we have been excited to receive support from the Diversity Committee.

While many students have expressed feeling empowered and encouraged by the actions, we have also heard that some  individuals feel that these microaggression posters and website encourage public shaming. We want to acknowledge that public shaming was not our intention.

  • The intent of posting the microaggressions was to highlight the daily discomfort of many students of color, women, disabled students, and LGBTQ students. While we recognize that it may not feel good to be  spotlighted as problematic, we see this as equalizing the discomfort that marginalized students feel on a daily basis.

  • At the end of the day, we believe we need to center the voices of students of color and otherwise marginalized students. While we are willing to have individual conversations around the voices of white students who felt challenged by the Microaggressions posters, this movement was led by students of color and was created with the intent to amplify the voices of students of color who have not felt that there is a space to express their experiences in this law school. We believe that shifting the conversation too far from that has the result (intended or unintended) of minimizing this mission.

We will be meeting on 3/2 during the lunch hour in Room 116 to debrief about the past week’s events. We encourage all students to come.

With Regard to the Tearing Down of the Microaggressions

It has come to our attention that there were some threatening emails directed at the staff member who took down the microaggressions from the wall. While there is a metaphorical aspect to this act that leads to well-intended critiques of how the administration handles direct action that doesn’t conform with protocol, LSWAIR has never intended to harm individual staff people and do not believe pointing the finger at individual actors is a productive strategy to address institutional oppression. We hope to encourage a dialogue around the culture within the institution that silences the voices of marginalized people. We ask students of the law school – particularly white students – to approach problematic comments and actions with the intent to “call in” rather than demonize. We acknowledge that racist and otherwise oppressive dialogue is deeply internalized, and that the most effective way to challenge these messages are to approach people with deep love and understanding.

A CALL TO ACTION

“The ultimate tragedy is not the oppression and cruelty by the bad people but the silence over that by the good people.” – Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Dear University of Washington School of Law:

I.  “Leaders for the Global Common Good”. This is the motto that attracted so many of us to this institution. However, the school’s limited response to the ongoing civil and racial injustices involving use of police force demonstrate that we are out of touch, and falling short of this noble and ambitious accolade. With respect and hope we, as law students, write to you today to right the ship; to demand urgent action and set a course for a more inclusive, diverse and aware learning environment.

II.  Our nation is at a pivotal moment in understanding and addressing oppression and structural racism. Social justice advocates must refocus their efforts to affirmatively advance racial equity. Yet UW Law has taken a cursory, shallow glance at what the rest of the nation is viewing in-depth. The most prestigious, highly-ranked law school in the Pacific Northwest, a law school in a city with a significant history of police use of force and racist practices, has remained silent on the most pertinent recent legal event gaining national and international attention today. What does that persistent silence tell us about our agency, our values, and our role as law students in this movement?

III.  There is a cultural disconnect that is pervasive throughout this institution. After students pushed for a response by the administration to the non-indictments of Darren Wilson and NYPD officers, a brief email was sent to UW Law students, inviting us to a lecture by Jeff Robinson. The event was well attended, and Mr. Robinson’s words were inspirational; however, three months later, UW Law has yet to follow up with any action. When students of color involved in protest actions and deeply affected by the events of Ferguson requested to postpone fall exams, they were told “no,” even though many law schools throughout the country honored such requests. This lack of empathy is pervasive throughout the institution, and contributes to the hostile environment within the law school that leaves students with marginalized identities behind. Yet all of this is no surprise with our minimally diverse student body, including only 2.5% African Americans.

 

  • UW Law has a history of student-led progress for racial equality. In 2013, student opposition extinguished plans for a proposed prosecution clinic at the school. In 2014, Critical Race Theory was finally added to the curriculum in response to student action. Although movements like these are important and admirable, they leave all of the work to already over-worked students and are radically insufficient. The institution is in need of a cultural shift.

 

  • We believe UW Law can develop the next generation of leaders to exercise our independent collective power to work towards a world without symptoms of institutional racism. If we want a more racially equitable education system, we must engage in difficult dialogue and continually question assumptions, experiences and methodology. It’s time we lead by example. It’s time we earn the right to call ourselves “Leaders for the Global Common Good”.

 

  • As University of Washington School of Law students of color and allies, we declare a state of emergency and demand the following from our institution:

 

DEMANDS

  • We demand a radical increase in the representation of diverse communities at the law school. As a public institution our demographics should be representative of the community. For both the inclusiveness of traditionally marginalized populations and the enhancement of our learning environmentdiversity of background equals diversity of ideas, which translates into more stimulating classroom discussion and debate.
  • The law school should strive for a diverse student population more in line with the community. For example, 8% African American student population to match the city of Seattle or, ideally, 14% to match the United States. Given the historical under-representation of African Americans in the legal profession, we are appalled that only 2 UW Law degrees were awarded to African Americans in 2014. Similarly, UW Law has 5% Hispanic enrollment, compared to 14% of the Washington State population.
  • Create a new “Alternative Admissions Program” coupled with academic support for applicants from non-traditional backgrounds. Although poaching the limited national pool for “qualified” applicants of color is the traditional method of increasing diversity, we believe it’s our duty to promote true equality through the redistribution of intellectual capital. We believe this goal is more important than any potential impact on the law school’s ranking.
  • Establish and fund an official community outreach program dedicated to providing mentoring and academic/LSAT support to foster the interest and success of future law school applicants in the community.
  • Recruit and retain more diverse faculty members, including Latino/Hispanic and African American tenured professors. Include as part of the tenure review process cultural sensitivity, research and demonstrated actions that promote diversity and awareness.
  • Create a full-time, paid staff position to facilitate issues of diversity. Dozens of students have organized through several student groups to begin working towards these goals; such a position would serve as a point-of-contact and be invaluable towards cultivating further ideas and actions. This position should have actual decision making power.
  • Include students on the Admissions panel, particularly students with marginalized identities. Students can speak better to what types of voices and opinions need to be reflected in the law school.
  • Ensure transparency for the generous gift of $56.1M from Jack MacDonald. The scholarship income from this trust should be prioritized with the mission of recruiting, enrolling, and retaining a more diverse student body.

 

  • We demand a curriculum more clearly focused on the mission of creating leaders for the global common good. Such courses will provide a foundation of social justice for graduates in careers of all types, and will work synergistically with the demands above.
    1. Offer more social justice courses for 2Ls and 3Ls. A survey should assess student demand for specific courses, but we believe UCLA Law’s course offerings can provide a starting point.
    2. Create and incorporate a new “capstone” course into the 1L curriculum with more big-picture elements of history, philosophy, critical legal studies, implicit bias, and critical race/feminist theory. The traditional 1L curriculum focuses so intensely on the minutiae of case law that it is easy to lose sight of why many of us came to law school in the first place. This course would serve to break the cycle of indoctrination and redirect student focus to the global common good.
    3. Make Critical Race Theory optional for 1Ls spring, 2015.
    4. Create a mandatory baseline training relating to issues of race and implicit bias. Such training could be incorporated into FLS. As lawyers, we will all be interacting with people. Just as the UW Medical School recognizes this important aspect of future professional life, we ask that UW Law provide cultural competency training. This training should start at FLS, continue through the 1L curriculum, and include an elective requirement for cultural competency classes in the 2L and/or 3L years.
    5. Create a training program for faculty to discuss issues of race and diversity. Includes a student presence in said training.
    6. Course assessments should include mandatory evaluation criteria for a professor’s ability to create an inclusive learning environment.
    7. Create an alternative spring break service project to allow students the opportunity to engage with communities, learn about real-world injustices, expand their world-view and learn about possible solutions and actions. Give students an opportunity to learn beyond the walls of the law school, beyond the few pages discussing these issues in our texts, beyond the comforts of Seattle.

Today we charge all members of UW Law to express solidarity with and support of all law students. Work with us to ensure that we truly are and will continue to be leaders for the global common good.

Some Good News

A big thanks to all of our readers who have been checking in to see if we’ve updated the blog.

It is difficult to maintain this site because it is tough to balance academics with the other parts of our lives.  Part of being a student at UW Law (UWLS) means pushing for positive change,  pushing against hurtful change and pushing to improve UWLS’ status quo. Suffice to say, it isn’t easy.

We were proud of the UW Law faculty who expressed their concerns about the clinic and through their eloquent, calm expressions, helped us stop the clinic.  One result of the most recent article on The Stranger‘s blog was that a prosecutor got his feelings hurt and spoke with a UW Law professor. She shared his complaints with all the faculty, which left some of us–perhaps especially the students of color–wondering why no faculty-wide emails have been sent out with concern about improving the situation for students of color at UW.  So we still have some room to grow, obviously.

On the other hand, our advocacy bore great fruit already! The prosecution clinic will not take such a drain from the school’s financial resources because it simply isn’t happening.  They decided to add a class especially for folks doing the prosecution externship (which already existed). This course will be co-taught with a former defender and the guy that they had intended to hire to do the prosecution clinic.  This great lessening of harm was because of your support of our student advocacy.  Thank you.

Another fruit: the school finally broke down and hired someone to come up with some potential plans for making UWLS a more equitable place.  Preliminary murmurs indicate that it isn’t quite the Diversity Plan we hoped for, and it wasn’t drafted by any of the people we suggested.  There were other problems, too; for example, few students were invited to give input on the front end of the report, and then the administration scheduled the back-end input for the very last day of 2L & 3L classes.  And they gave only a single day’s notice.  Whatever the case, we believe that the report that will be issued could bring about lasting change if we use it as a tool to keep on pushing.   And we are proud to say that a few more faculty are on board to help push for the changes we need.

And perhaps the sweetest fruit yet: we had our first quarter of Critical Race Theory, the result of at least six years of advocacy led by students of color. The class is excellent and taught by an amazing professor, practitioner and community empowering activist.

We have filed a new public disclosure request with the school just to ensure that this externship stuff is not fraught with the same problems that the clinic had.  It may take months to get the documents, but we will let you know when we do.

Meanwhile, the most recently acquired information from the King County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office and UWLS is available for everyone to review at this link:

 

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/h2iyu6i0bhv12fe/AABUN-Gk2ZDOk5UPtuIRIWfGa

 

Thank you again for all your support.  We will probably not update again for a while.  If you like, contact us at uwlawracialjustice@gmail.com and we will get back to you.

 

No Prosecution Clinic for Now

We consider this delay of the clinic a partial victory.  Part of the delay is due to the fact that the faculty has more access to accurate information since we provided them with all of the information gleaned from our public disclosure requests.  More information led to their having more concerns.

This further demonstrates that this so-called process has been quite opaque. Students feel like this is a victory for lots of reasons, including that we won’t be funding an already well-funded state agency. Some of us just don’t like the idea of helping put more people in jail, especially since our public disclosure documents showed that the clinic did not have as its goals any discussion of racial justice or racial disparities until after a student outcry, something that was misrepresented multiple times by the administration prior to our public disclosures.

Another reason we consider this a victory is that we made more information more available to people who need it to make these decisions; after that, the faculty listserve ignited with really important discussions. The administration realized that this wasn’t going to skate through anymore and so they pulled the plug on the vote the night before it was to happen. So there’s victory there, even if the struggle continues.

And simultaneously we recognize that future prosecutors want this clinic, and for various reasons, including the very important point for them that it could lead to their later employment. However, there has to be a way without a clinic that gets them the training and work opportunities that all students deserve. I would hope that even students in favor of the clinic could see that $12,000 per month to a prosecutor is not the best use of clinic funds where clinics that met unmet legal needs struggle to get by.

So is the clinic dead?  Hopefully.  The clinic has been shelved at least temporarily while a committee considers the Criminal Justice Track we proposed. Originally we suggested a Prosecution Track, but it has since expanded to include more future lawyers in the training and this is a good move.

Nevertheless, we are concerned with this process because the main proponent of the clinic is on this committee, and in fact chairs the committee. This has its dangers and benefits, but whatever the case, we are watching the committee closely and pushing for more student involvement therein.

This delay wasn’t just because we held a silent demo during their meeting or even because we lobbied professors; faculty themselves took the information from the public disclosure requests and serious questions were raised in their hearts and minds.

We know there are other solutions to training future lawyers that don’t involve us funding prosecution. Now the administration and students are working to find the best win-win for the students.  And for our greater community in King County.

Finally, we don’t want to demonize prosecutors.  They have lots of power to determine whether the ridiculous rates of racial disparities continue, so angering them is not our goal.  We hope that current and future prosecutors will do all they can to change the criminal punishment system into a criminal justice system. We hope that they might understand that $36,000 per quarter is not something UW Law can pay for given the other needs in our school and our broader community.

Please follow our blog and share it widely.  Contact the faculty members on the committee and let them know that this track is a much better idea than the clinic.  The faculty members include:

– Prof. Maranville (chair)
– Prof. Ambrose
– Prof. Knudsen
– Prof. McCormack
– Prof. Spitzer
– Prof. Bailey

Community members from UW and the broader King County community joined together for a silent candle light vigil; the faculty walked passed us on their way into the meeting.

Community members from UW and the broader King County community joined together for a silent candle light vigil; the faculty walked passed us on their way into the meeting.

Letter to Voting Faculty

This letter was sent by us to UW Law voting faculty the day before they were to vote on the clinic. Student and faculty pressure was so great, however, that UW Law administration delayed the vote just minutes after this email was sent. Note the link below to view the public disclosure documents from the King County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office and UW Law.
Dear Professors,

With respect and hope we students write you to preserve the best and most efficient use of our limited resources for the global common good.

To that end, we share that there are indeed multiple reasons to vote no on the prosecution clinic tomorrow, as well as information obtained via public disclosure requests.

Briefly, some reasons are:

1) Our criminal justice system today results in the highest rate of incarceration in the world and the discriminate incarceration of communities of color. This is an institution stating it is committed to the “global common good,” yet this clinic would have adverse collateral effects on vulnerable communities within the state. We don’t believe the educational benefits of this clinic outweigh the negative consequences.

2) The proponents of this clinic promised in an email last year that the “supervising attorney from the King County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office must be someone who has a demonstrated commitment to addressing problems of racial disparity.” (emphasis added) There was also a requirement that the person have experience teaching. But as an advisory committee memorandum pointed out, the person chosen has no experience teaching and further “was not able to identify any prior actions that he has taken which demonstrate a commitment to addressing problems of racial disparity, mass incarceration, or wrongful conviction.”

3) Is this clinic really advantageous for students? With eight UW Law students housed at the KCPO, and a fully-funded clinical instructor from UW Law doing supervising work that would normally require more attorneys from KCPO, the clinic could actually discourage KCPO from hiring Rule 15 students to work and make money in their office. Instead, students would have to pay over $7,300 per quarter for tuition as a part of this clinic; why are we going to make students pay to play?

4) We value the clinical education currently available and the faculty who take on this difficult and courageous work.  We know many of them have to raise funds to keep these clinics going.  To that end, we don’t believe it is the best use of resources to fund a new clinic not in keeping with our school’s mission of the global common good.  We don’t believe this school should pay a prosecutor $12,000 per month to teach a clinic when he has no experience teaching.  This is not a good use of resources.

To view all of the documents thus far obtained via public disclosure request from UW Law, go to:

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/h2iyu6i0bhv12fe/AABUN-Gk2ZDOk5UPtuIRIWfGa

To view all of the documents thus far obtained via public disclosure request from KCPO, go to the same link: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/h2iyu6i0bhv12fe/AABUN-Gk2ZDOk5UPtuIRIWfGa

Please vote no on the prosecution clinic tomorrow.

Yours,

UW Law Students Opposed to the Prosecution Clinic